The roar of Giants fans infiltrated the air as ticker-tape and toilet paper filled the sky on Tuesday, when players invaded the Financial District’s Canyon of Heroes to commend the team’s 2012 Super Bowl victory.

“New York is the way to be,” said Staten Island native Philip Austria, 25, a Giants aficionado for the past 11 years. “This is New York’s biggest fan base for the Giants. I came in 2008 and now I’m here again, nothing’s better.”

While most parade-goers sported classic jerseys and tees to honor the two-time champions, the New York Giants fairies decided to veer away from the sea of blue.

Marni Halasa and fellow football fairy Stephanie Chernick, both of Manhattan, donned princess crowns, fluffy tutus, and extravagant wings complete with Giants tees. The ladies have also dressed the part in past parades for performance artists and agreed that the outfits are “normal for us.”

“Other NFL teams have cheerleaders, so we are going to be their official cheerleaders,” said Chernick.

Both young and old alike gathered downtown to get a glimpse of their favorite team player. For Brandon Mapp, 11, skipping school to join in the celebration was a worthy holiday.

“I’ve been a Giants fan since I was born basically, I’m very excited they won,” Mapp said as he then gushed about his sports idol scoring the winning touchdown. “When Ahmad Bradshaw sat down, that was like the best play ever.”

Anthony Bataglia, 8, also didn’t mind playing hooky to take part in his first Giants parade.

“I’m really happy because they played football their whole life to win,” Bataglia said. “It feels good. I got to see them on the floats.”

Some fervent fans, like Kevin Quinn of Oakland, Long Island, used vacation time to join in the festivities.

“I’m here legally, not playing hooky,” said Quinn, a fan since he was 2-years-old. “I sat behind the I-beam in (the old) Yankee Stadium, that was my first game.”

Quinn further added that being surrounded by others who share the same love and passion for the Giants is “crazy,” but overall, an experience that cannot be replaced.

“Manhattan is ours today,” he said.